Profile: The multi-talented Bulinki the Tailor

Known for his extra ordinary voice “Bulinki” is a Multi-disciplinary artist and aspiring
businessman, who was born and bred in the streets of Namakgale, Phalaborwa within
the Limpopo Province.

2016-07-02 17.39.22.jpgBulinki is a talented singer, songwriter, producer, composer, fashion designer and rapper. Fondly known to his audience as
Bulinki The Tailor, he is a young artist with a distinct husky but soothing voice, that
gives a rich sound to his music.

He recently released his debut EP project
BLACKLIPS TAPE with the smash hit A RE FIHLA featuring Pretoria-based MC Mloper. The song air-played live on various radio stations and gained popularity, although it was just a teaser from his catalogue of upcoming hits.

Listen to “A RE Fihla by Bulinki”

The Tailor is also a founder of the aspiring record label TAILOP MUSIC, which seeks to provide fellow Limpopo artists a platform to showcase their skills. Bulinki, as well as long-term confidant/manager Joshua Chauke, have both been involved in the organizing of the newly formed social market, THE STREET MARKET PHALABORWA™“SMP” that promotes multi-faceted artwork in photography, painting, beading, music, fashion, craft work, among the youth.

The events hosted by The Street Market movement, are developed by a young intercultural crew who pursue art as a tool of improving their communities, social standing and themselves as individuals.

Bulinki recently delivered a highly captivating performance at a Phalaborwa event which definitely left the audience in awe. From humble beginnings, this musician is tailoring the path for ALL Limpopo youth towards a crime- and drug-free, brighter future.
Major Performances
1. VIP Magazine launch (University of Limpopo, 2016)
2. Miss Mopani 2016 (Namakgale, 2016)
3. Freedom Madness Weekend (Mpumalanga, 2016)
4. State theatre weekly sessions (Johannesburg, 2015)
5. ANC Rally (Seshego, 2014)
6. LA Crushers 25th anniversary (Phalaborwa, 2014)
Major Collaborations
1. Charmza De DJ
2. Mloper
3. Vic Mash
4. Mopedy
5. Mlazah
Contact Details

Trevor Bulinki Mangena

078 536 1391

Joshua Chauke
 072 045 9977

bulinki22@gmail.com

Joshua.jpe01@gmail.com

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Tips for Growing your Youtube Audience

Online video content is quickly becoming THE #1 form of mass media outreach.  According to their own stats, YouTube sees more than 300 hours of video uploaded per minute, and Facebook has literally billions of video shares each day.

Growing your YouTube audience is a highly effective  way of spreading word of your music, but it’s about more than just making a great music video.

Top Tips For Expanding Your YouTube Outreach

1 – You don’t need a huge budget.

It’s easy to think of a music video as a huge, elaborate production… but it doesn’t have to be.  Just as one example, there is this guy known as Jay Mokopo who likes to remix songs of popular artists, that guy always does music videos when he releases his tracks and they’re of quality, but I believe he doesn’t spend too much in making them, as a matter of fact you can even make a video of yourself singing in studio and still get a couple of views on Youtube, it doesn’t really matter how you do it, what’s important is that atleast you must have two to three music videos that are on Youtube.

2 – Make interview spots.

This is a great all-around tool in an indie musician’s video arsenal.  Find someone who can act as an interviewer, and film a 5-minute clip that mimics the format of similar spots on MTV Base or Channel O.  It allows your act to tell their story in their own words, in a short, easily-digestible format.

(Also you can send us your videos (interviews) so that we can share it on our ever increasing Youtube channel).

These can also do double or triple-duty.  Besides gaining shares on YouTube, they can also go into your media portfolio or even potentially be aired on TV.

3 – Invite audience participation.

Don’t forget to get your fans involved!  Invite them to submit, say, pictures or videos of your recent shows, so that the material can be edited together into a new video.  If you give credit at the end to all of your volunteer camera-operators, they’ll be sharing the results -and your music- with all their friends.

Or get more creative!  Anything that involves your fans will likely pay off in shares.

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Handling rejection as a musician.

If you can’t handle hearing “no” from time to time, you’re probably not going to get very far in the music business.

Any independent artist with any talent is going to be passionate about their music, and that’s a good thing. But rejection is part of the game, and you’ll run into people who don’t appreciate, or simply don’t like, your music.

Rejection

Getting past this is one of the most important elements of succeeding in the music business.

Don’t Let Rejections Bring You Down!

1 – Remember, there’s a very big ocean out there.

There are more music publishers, and more outlets for promoting your music, than ever before. It used to be that if you got rejected by all the Big Name labels, your career was probably finished. But not anymore!

If you find the mainstream labels are rejecting you, look for niche labels who already publish music closer to your existing style.

2 – Take criticisms as a learning opportunity.

All the great musicians spent decades honing their craft, at least aside from those who drank or drugged themselves into an early grave. (A.K.A.: how NOT to handle rejection.) No matter how great you might be now, honestly, you’ll be even better in another few years.

When someone says “I can’t publish/promote you for reasons X, Y, and Z,” take a serious look at their explanation. There’s probably good advice in there, especially if it’s coming from someone who’s been in the music business longer than you.

3 – Do more fan outreach.

If you’ve got the fans, but can’t get a publisher to pay attention, encourage the fans to do more. (And, in turn, do more yourself to reward the fans.) Sometimes sheer numbers can make an argument in your favor, if you can show, for example, steadily increasing iTunes sales or T-shirt profits.

Plus, regional fame is another good route to getting noticed by larger publishers and promoters.

So, how do YOU handle rejections?

Convert Listeners Into Fans

If you want to get anywhere in music today, fan interaction is a major part of it. There are so many options in music, and so many ways to obtain it (legally or not) that fans are only going to be loyal to musicians who truly give something back.

Music Fans

This is a problem that we see more indie artists facing: Their music is out there, on streaming services and online stores, but that’s not turning into tickets and T-shirt sales. In other words, they have listeners, but not fans.

What’s the difference between gaining actual fans and languishing in obscurity? Fan interaction, mostly.

Fan Interaction Turns Your Music Into Something More

1 – Start Blogging and Tweeting

Any indie musician working today needs to be savvy about social media and online outreach. A popular blog, Twitter feed or Facebook page will go a long way toward building fans. Since these outlets all encourage visitors to share and retweet, interesting posts or cool photos will get your message out via interested fans.

2 – Give Out Occasional Freebies

Some of you may balk at working for free, but it’s a valuable option when looking to build your fan base. A “B-side” track, unreleased demo or exclusive music video will all do plenty to spread the word.

Some artists have even given out entire albums for free. Often these are limited-time offers, or sometimes just a way of distributing an experimental album that might not be commercially viable. Lecrae did this with his “Church Clothes” mixtape project.

3 – Do More Onstage Interacting  

A live music performance should be an experience for the audience, not just a note-by-note recreation of your latest album. Anything you can do to involve your audience during a show will generally garner better reviews and more word-of-mouth among people who see you.

Intricate dance numbers or complex light shows are fun, but in what I have seen, the artists who actually can initiate fan interaction in the show directly are the ones who build a dedicated fan base.

So, have you seen any good examples of fan-building lately?