Profile: Zimbabwean rapper Shonaman

 

The Zimbabwean born rapper known as Shona man hails from Gutu, Zimbabwe now residing in South Africa since 2012. Clearly a talented minister, his first music video was nominated for best music video of the year by LIMHOP awards in 2015, while in secondary school Shona man began his music career by doing cyphers during class breaks with fellow high schoolmates which led to the development of his stage name Shonaman since he was in South Africa and rapping in Shona.

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He cites his main influencers in hip-hop are artists like Eminem, Lil’ Wayne, Frank Edwards. He honed his skills as a rapper by getting invitations in different events area his area in Limpopo, claiming his first victory on his very first attempt at I am women foundation 1st anniversary.

He believes change begins with one and spread to the rest , he says “my main aim is to make music that will leave footsteps even to the next generation, providing enjoyment to the mass and at the same time bringing hope, joy and peace to the lives of people through my music.One of my key objectives is to maintain a high profile and to continue to maintain a strong relationship with other core members”.

Stream and buy Shonaman latest track #HouseOfTheLord

 

 

Follow him on twitter @shonaman_ppa

 

Handling rejection as a musician.

If you can’t handle hearing “no” from time to time, you’re probably not going to get very far in the music business.

Any independent artist with any talent is going to be passionate about their music, and that’s a good thing. But rejection is part of the game, and you’ll run into people who don’t appreciate, or simply don’t like, your music.

Rejection

Getting past this is one of the most important elements of succeeding in the music business.

Don’t Let Rejections Bring You Down!

1 – Remember, there’s a very big ocean out there.

There are more music publishers, and more outlets for promoting your music, than ever before. It used to be that if you got rejected by all the Big Name labels, your career was probably finished. But not anymore!

If you find the mainstream labels are rejecting you, look for niche labels who already publish music closer to your existing style.

2 – Take criticisms as a learning opportunity.

All the great musicians spent decades honing their craft, at least aside from those who drank or drugged themselves into an early grave. (A.K.A.: how NOT to handle rejection.) No matter how great you might be now, honestly, you’ll be even better in another few years.

When someone says “I can’t publish/promote you for reasons X, Y, and Z,” take a serious look at their explanation. There’s probably good advice in there, especially if it’s coming from someone who’s been in the music business longer than you.

3 – Do more fan outreach.

If you’ve got the fans, but can’t get a publisher to pay attention, encourage the fans to do more. (And, in turn, do more yourself to reward the fans.) Sometimes sheer numbers can make an argument in your favor, if you can show, for example, steadily increasing iTunes sales or T-shirt profits.

Plus, regional fame is another good route to getting noticed by larger publishers and promoters.

So, how do YOU handle rejections?

Convert Listeners Into Fans

If you want to get anywhere in music today, fan interaction is a major part of it. There are so many options in music, and so many ways to obtain it (legally or not) that fans are only going to be loyal to musicians who truly give something back.

Music Fans

This is a problem that we see more indie artists facing: Their music is out there, on streaming services and online stores, but that’s not turning into tickets and T-shirt sales. In other words, they have listeners, but not fans.

What’s the difference between gaining actual fans and languishing in obscurity? Fan interaction, mostly.

Fan Interaction Turns Your Music Into Something More

1 – Start Blogging and Tweeting

Any indie musician working today needs to be savvy about social media and online outreach. A popular blog, Twitter feed or Facebook page will go a long way toward building fans. Since these outlets all encourage visitors to share and retweet, interesting posts or cool photos will get your message out via interested fans.

2 – Give Out Occasional Freebies

Some of you may balk at working for free, but it’s a valuable option when looking to build your fan base. A “B-side” track, unreleased demo or exclusive music video will all do plenty to spread the word.

Some artists have even given out entire albums for free. Often these are limited-time offers, or sometimes just a way of distributing an experimental album that might not be commercially viable. Lecrae did this with his “Church Clothes” mixtape project.

3 – Do More Onstage Interacting  

A live music performance should be an experience for the audience, not just a note-by-note recreation of your latest album. Anything you can do to involve your audience during a show will generally garner better reviews and more word-of-mouth among people who see you.

Intricate dance numbers or complex light shows are fun, but in what I have seen, the artists who actually can initiate fan interaction in the show directly are the ones who build a dedicated fan base.

So, have you seen any good examples of fan-building lately?

Durban rapper Abdus releases new single titled “LOL”

Largely self-made musician Abdus is releasing his new single of his forthcoming project, the title of the single is LOL “LOL is about resistance, it’s about not conforming to what hip hop is nowadays. It’s a stamp that certifies independence as well.” says Abdus. 

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Abdus is known as one of the hottest unsigned artists in South African music. His songs regularly makes use of fables, stories and intricate wordplay that bounces back and forth playing a sort of boxing game with the beat. Educated referencing is perhaps the strongest characteristic of his lyrical output. For him no story is allowed to stand-alone instead all of his work and songs somehow reference their past and each other.

His album The Library, which was released in 2013, is full of heavy punch lines and is also showcasing his story telling abilities. It is a well-crafted album that has you at the edge of your seat.

“My plans are to display to people that some people still pick up a book and read so they can share valuable info and that some of us are far from throwing in the towel in educating young minds.” says Abdus when asked about his plans for 2014/2015.

Please download LOL here http: